Saturday, October 18, 2014

How to Make a Kyoshi Warrior Cosplay Costume

My daughter and I attended Boston Comic Con in August.  I had never attended a Comic Con before and didn't know what to expect.  We saw an impressive group of artists and comic book illustrators, and of course, attendees dressed as their favorite characters.  




The day was spectacular and I felt as if I was with a celebrity! My daughter, dressed as her favorite Kyoshi warrior, Suki, from Avatar the Last Airbender, must have had her picture taken over 70 times that day. It was such a thrill to have others recognize her and ask to have their photos taken with her.


The highlight of the day was running into other airbending friends.  Each time we bumped into another character there was an instant connection.  Seeing Aang and Toph through the crowd and watching them lay eyes on my Kyoshi Warrior, I wish I could adequately describe the reaction.  Jaws dropped, eyes popped, and they started rushing toward each other as if they had been searching for one another, just so they could take pictures and record the moment.




More fun moments were meeting up with other animated characters.








How to Make a Kyoshi Warrior Costume


Here is how we made the Kyoshi warrior costume.  My daughter drew me a picture of what she wanted for a costume.
I started with McCalls sewing pattern M2940 and a few supplies.  We purchased everything but the wooden fans at Jo-Ann Fabrics.  The wooden fans were ordered through Amazon (see the picture link below).



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For the head piece, we started with a foam visor (to be worn upside down).
We hot-glued chopsticks to the visor and then cut a square piece of foam from a craft foam sheet and glued that on top of the chopsticks.  We spray painted the visor and the wooden fans with gold spray paint then hot glued the tassel cord along the inside rim of the visor.  I found a foam sword and spray painted that gold as well.

I made the karate gee top and the kimono belt from from the McCalls sewing pattern. I then made a simple skirt with an elastic waistband and colored side panels that matched the karate gee top. (I did not have a pattern for the skirt, but will post directions if anyone is interested.)


The breast-plate was made out of some scrap vinyl I had left over from another project.  I secured the pieces together with small pieces of wire, crimped with a needle nose pliers.

The dark gray sleeves were made out of felt.

Makeup completed the look. 

We are already looking forward to next year's Comic Con and thinking of new costume ideas!




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